Todays society gender differences essays

This section contains words approx. Explores differences in Macro and Micro Level Theories on individuals and their interactions. Describes the three major theoretical perspectives.

Todays society gender differences essays

Gender roles are largely a product of the way in which one was raised and may not be in conformance with one's gender identity. Research shows that both genetics and environment influence the development of gender roles.

Gender Roles

As society changes, its gender roles often also change to meet the needs of the society. To this end, it has been suggested that androgynous gender roles in which both females and males are expected to display either expressive emotion-oriented or instrumental goal-oriented behaviors as called for by the situation may be better for both the individual and the society in many ways.

However, this is not to say that traditional roles, reversed roles, or anything in between are inherently bad. More research is needed to better understand the influences of genetics and environment on the acquisition of gender roles and the ways in which different types of gender roles support the stability and growth of society.

In the s, for example, little girls were said to be made of "sugar and spice and everything nice" and wore pastel organdy dresses and gloves to church.

In the s and s, however, this all changed for many women; bras were discarded, and patched jeans became de rigueur. In fact, each succeeding generation has brought with it differing expectations for how men and women should act within society. Despite these changes, however, the truth is that modern society still has expectations for how men and women are to act.

Although we may be more open to exceptions than were past generations, there still are expected norms of behavior for women and men in society.

Sex In biosocial terms, gender is not the same as sex. Gender refers to the psychological, social, cultural, and behavioral characteristics associated with being female or male.

Gender is defined by one's gender identity and learned gender role. Sex, on the other hand, refers in this context to the biological aspects of being either female or male. Genetically, females are identified by having two X chromosomes and males by having an X and a Y chromosome.

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In addition, sex can typically be determined from either primary or secondary sexual characteristics. Primary sexual characteristics comprise the female or male reproductive organs i. Secondary sexual characteristics comprise the superficial differences between the sexes that occur with puberty e.

Biology as Gender Role Determinant It is relatively easy to see that biology has an impact on gender and the subsequent actions and behaviors that are thought to be more relevant to either females or males. For example, no matter how much a man might want to experience giving birth, the simple fact is that he cannot, except as an observer.

Todays society gender differences essays

From this fact it is easy if not necessarily logical to assume that biology is destiny and, therefore, women and men have certain unalterable roles in society—for example, that women are the keepers of home and hearth because of their reproductive role, while men are the protectors and providers because of their relatively greater size and strength.

However, before concluding that biology is destiny in terms of gender roles, it is important to understand that not only do gender roles differ from culture to culture, they also change over time within the same culture.

Early 20th-century American culture emphasized that a woman's role was in the home. As a result, many women did not have high school educations and never held jobs; instead, they quite happily raised families and supported their husbands by keeping their households running smoothly.

Nearly a century later, this gender role is no longer the norm or at least not the only acceptable norm and sounds quite constricting to our more educated, career-oriented 21st-century ears.

If biology were the sole determinant of gender roles, such changes would not be possible. Culture as Gender Role Determinant In 21st-century United States culture, gender roles continue to be in a state of flux to some extent, although traditional gender roles still apply in many quarters.

For example, boys are often encouraged to become strong, fast, aggressive, dominant, and achieving, while traditional roles for girls are to be sensitive, intuitive, passive, emotional, and interested in the things of home and family. However, these gender roles are culturally bound. For example, in the Tchambuli culture of New Guinea, gender roles for women include doing the fishing and manufacturing as well as controlling the power and economic life of the community.

Tchambuli women also take the lead in initiating sexual relations. Tchambuli men, on the other hand, are dependent, flirtatious, and concerned with their appearance, often adorning themselves with flowers and jewelry.

In the Tchambuli culture, men's interests revolve around such activities as art, games, and theatrics Coon, If gender roles were completely biologically determined, the wide disparity between American and Tchambuli gender roles would not be possible. Therefore, it must be assumed that culture and socialization also play a part in gender role acquisition.

Society as Gender Role Determinant Socialization is the process by which individuals learn to differentiate between what society regards as acceptable and unacceptable behavior and act in a manner that is appropriate for the needs of the society.

The socialization process for teaching gender roles begins almost immediately after birth, when infant girls are typically held more gently and treated more tenderly than are infant boys, and continues as the child grows, with both mothers and fathers usually playing more roughly with their male children than with their female children.

As the child continues to grow and mature, little boys are typically allowed to roam a wider territory without permission than are little girls. Similarly, boys are typically expected to run errands earlier than are girls.

Whereas sons are told that "real boys don't cry" and are encouraged to control their softer emotions, girls are taught not to fight and not to show anger or aggression. In general, girls are taught to engage in expressive, or emotion-oriented, behaviors, while boys are taught to engage in instrumental, or goal-oriented, behaviors.The Mexico culture believes in many things like gender roles, language, religion and much more.

Mexican people believe that every generation has to be same for the females and males.

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Apr 22,  · Inequality, Race, and Remedy. Alan Jenkins. burdens, or responsibilities that we bear in our society. Because we believe that all people are created equal in terms of rights, dignity, and the potential to achieve great things, we see inequality based on race, gender, and other social characteristics as not only unfortunate but.

Todays society gender differences essays

Social stigma is the disapproval of, or discrimination against, a person based on perceivable social characteristics that serve to distinguish them from other members of a society.

Social stigmas are commonly related to culture, gender, race, and health. This guide stresses the systematic causal analysis of gender inequality. The analytical questions raised and the readings listed consider why and how gender inequality arises, varies across and within societies, persists over generations, produces conformity by individuals and institutions, resists change, and sometimes changes dramatically.

Gender roles can be defined as the behaviors and attitudes expected of male and female members of a society by that society.

However, “A person's sexuality comes from within him or her, making a person heterosexual, homosexual, bisexual, or asexual, depending . In the essays The Myth of Race by Agustin Fuentes, Why Do We make So Much of Gender by Allan G. Johnson and Seeing and Making Culture: Representing the Poor by bell hooks the authors display the many myths that society has given to a certain group of people whether it be in terms of race, gender .

Understanding Gender | Gender Spectrum