A report on the education of nineteenth century women artists

Sculpture Why we love her: Hosmer is officially known as the first professional woman sculptor. Additionally, she moved from America to Rome at 22 years old and joined an expatriate community of writers and artists, with a prominent circle of independent women. Harriet Powers Bible quilt, Mixed Media.

A report on the education of nineteenth century women artists

This lecture addresses issues of gender—masculine and feminine—in nineteenth-century art. It primarily focuses on works produced in France, corresponding with the standard narrative of the nineteenth-century survey.

However, images produced in Britain, Belgium, and the United States are also addressed. Men belonged to the public sphere, in the realms of politics, commerce, religion, and academia.

They should be physically strong and serve as the breadwinners of their families. Women, on the other hand, belonged to the private sphere, raising the family and caring for the home, and should be delicate and demure.

This subject could also, however, be discussed chronologically since changes in the treatment of gender are quite often the product of larger socio-political events.

Female Artists Gender and the Nude This lesson is by no means a comprehensive discussion of gender in the nineteenth century. It is an overview of several artists, artworks, and common trends prevalent at that time. Many of the topics discussed in this lecture could also be taken forward into discussions about the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

For example, the end of the nineteenth century marks the beginning of an important gender revolution that eventually developed into the first wave of the feminist movement.

Since this is an art history lecture, encourage your students to think about physical characteristics as well as personality traits. And, if you find that your students are providing a lot of value-laden terms, consider circling or starring those words to then discuss why we associate so many positive or negative attributes with a certain gender.

This lecture addresses issues of gender in nineteenth-century art, a context that predated understandings of gender as a continuum instead of a binary construction.

They both address constraints for female artists, which could be discussed and then used to more broadly examine the gender expectations of nineteenth-century society.

Translated and edited by Jonathan Mayne. Manchester University Press, Upper Saddle River, NJ: Masculinity, Muscularity and Modernity.

Thames and Hudson, A Critical History, And Other Essays, In Nineteenth-Century Art: A Critical History, New York: Thames & Hudson, New York: Thames & Hudson, “Morisot’s Wet Nurse: The Construction of Work and Leisure in Impressionist Painting” In Women, Art, and Power: And Other Essays, Women artists in nineteenth-century France and England: their art education, exhibition opportunities and membership of exhibiting societies and academies, with an assessment of the subject matter of their work and summary biographies, Volume 1.

Women were professionally active in the academic discipline of art history already in the nineteenth century and participated in the important shift early in the century that began involving an "emphatically corporeal visual subject", with Vernon Lee as a notable example.

Throughout the nineteenth century, women artists had to overcome great odds to pursue their livelihoods. Besides the prejudice that women weren't meant to create serious art as expressed by such male critics as Legrange, women also found that entrance into premier art schools ranged from extremely difficult to impossible.

A report on the education of nineteenth century women artists

In Nineteenth-Century Art: A Critical History, New York: Thames & Hudson, New York: Thames & Hudson, “Morisot’s Wet Nurse: The Construction of Work and Leisure in Impressionist Painting” In Women, Art, and Power: And Other Essays, The English Woman's Journal was among the first periodicals to report on the progress of women's art education in the mid-nineteenth century.

[End Page ] The mainstream press also commented on, and generally approved of, developments in women's art education.

Women Artists -- Art Education for Women